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http://www.nspresearch.unimelb.edu.au/archive.html
1. Guiding statement

Syringes inspire hope, fear, pleasure, pain, and confidence. Like
any technology, what we do with them and how we use them, gives
them meaning. Since their inception syringes have represented
different things to different segments of the community.

People have very different relationships with syringes. For some,
syringes are the source of healing and remedy. For others,
syringes represent the risk of infectious disease and the
existence of injecting drug use. The syringe in this sense
carries great weight as a symbol. In the face of the negative
symbology we often forget the multiple cultural dimensions to
syringes. Syringes are part of life and culture.

This exhibition celebrates the syringe in all its dimensions
through the different cultural and emotional landscapes into
which they are insinuated. Our culture determines what syringes
can do and alternately, how syringes have shaped the culture of
technology, medicine, the clinic, communities, the body, and drug
use.

2. Emphases Everyday voices – a day in the life A feature of
Needle and Syringe Cultures is the focus on voice. If syringes
are what we make them to be, we need to outline just what we do
with them to make them into culturally meaningful objects.

The exhibition will use a range of voices to articulate the
varied accounts of how syringe cultures interpenetrate society in
everyday settings. Different syringes The exhibition will provide
a wide array of syringes over time from their medieval origins to
modern nanotech applications.

3. Technology

The following are possible: • Audio recordings of a variety of
people from different disciplines explaining how they use
syringes • Digital video projecting cultural landscapes, using
projections onto large format surfaces • Static displays –
especially older syringes • Installations – including syringe
vending machines • Short digital video clips from interviews with
Australian policy makers

4. Target audiences Key audiences for the exhibit include: •
Secondary and tertiary students • General public • Health
professionals including: o Workers from hospital and community
based health services o Policy and program staff including key
advisers o Scientists and researchers • Journalists and other
media professionals including print media and television with
expertise in health and cultural reporting.
Needle and syringe cultures exhibition

Download exhibition movie trailer: exhibit_teaser.divx (20Mb)

Trailer is in DivX format, you may need to download the DivX media player.

Download free DIVX media player

The exhibition catalogue is now available.

The PDF document contains hyperlinks to the online micro-movies that form the core of the exhibition.
Download exhibition catalogue (1,2 Mb)

Archive of exhibition micro movies

Any of the 38 micro movies screening as part of the Needle and
Syringe Cultures exhibition can be downloaded by clicking on the
links below

All files are in windows media file format (320x240 pixels). Mac
users should download flip4mac or other translation plugins to
view these files using quicktime.

Belonging movies

Nadja describes the force of family culture in reducing syringe sharing in Lebanon (6 min)
The challenges for harm reduction internationally (3 mins) 
A young marketer talks about marketing syringe services (3 mins) 
A collection of syringe images from the Fairfax photoarchive (2 mins) 
Annie Madden, (Australian Injecting and Illicit Drug Users League) talks about AIVL (2 mins)
Jo Kim describes the bases for peer-based work with people who inject drugs (5 mins) 
The Kids in the House media campaign for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation shows the successful use of syringes in news media (2 mins)
Police educating other police about needle and syringe exchange in China (4 mins)
Damon Brogan, (VIVAIDS) discusses how society fears both syringes and dug users (4 mins) 
A peer worker describes what happens at a needle exchange (5 mins)

Confidence movies

Hugh Parsons walks us through the syringe disposal process (4 mins)
Sandra uses icing syringes to decorate cakes (10 mins)
Dr Banwell talks about syringes in marathon horse riding events (2 mins)
Bicycle repairer fixes a hub with a grease syringe (5 mins)
Siavash, a medical doctor describes the complexities of injecting culture in Iran (5 mins)
Young Harriet gets her vaccinations (2 mins)
A needle and syringe disposal worker talks about his world (2 mins)

Discovery movies

Description of the new nanotech drug delivery patch (3 mins)
How the patch was developed (6 mins) 
Syringe reuse and the WHO Safe Injecting Global Network (5 mins)
Nevershare: The latest innovation in traditional syringe technology (4 mins) 
Shooting video of people injecting in Glasgow is safer than people think (3 mins)

Fear movies

Mother of a diabetic talks about the stigma sssociated with syringes (4 mins)
A peer worker describes a syringe attack (5 mins)
Parents talk of how their experiences with syringes shape their kids’ experiences (7 mins)
Fear of syringes in north America and Uzbekistan (4 mins)
A young woman describes how syringes are used in central asia (2 mins)
Footage of German injecting rooms used in public education campaigns (5 mins)
Politicians involved in the introduction of syringe programs discuss public fear (6 mins)
A surgeon talks about body envelope violation (3 mins)

Hope movies

Julie and her family show how syringes are a part of life for diabetics (5 mins)
An inventor describes the making of a retractable syringe (6 mins)
A syringe distributor explains her job (2 mins)
Syringe disposal as public good (3 mins)
A photoessay showing the realities and aesthetics of living with diabetes (2 mins)

Pleasure movies

Injecting in Hollywood film (5 min)
This 1998 advertisement for the Salvation Army caused quite a stir on Australian TV (1 mins)

 

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